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 Post subject: Re: Epidemic of volcano awakenings across planet continues‏
PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 12:41 pm 
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ALASKA – Eruptions

May 16, 2013 – ALASKA – Eruptions from Pavlof Volcano continued on Wednesday after rumbling to life earlier in the week. The 8,261-foot peak on the Alaska Peninsula awoke Monday morning, kicking off a “low-level eruption of lava,” according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). Sitting about 30 miles northeast of the community of King Cove, Pavlof is a frequently-active volcano that last erupted in 2007. The volcano’s rumbling has strengthened this week. At about noon Tuesday, satellite images showed a lava flow had coursed a third of a mile down the northern side of the volcano. By late Tuesday, an ash plume extended 15,000 feet above sea level, moving downwind to the northeast for up to 100 miles before dispersing.


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 Post subject: Re: Epidemic of volcano awakenings across planet continues‏
PostPosted: Wed May 22, 2013 6:19 pm 
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Turrialba Volcano, located east of the province of Cartago

COSTA RICA - At 5 a.m. Tuesday morning, the Turrialba Volcano, located east of the province of Cartago, began to spew gas and ash from two crater openings, the Volcanological and Seismological Observatory of Costa Rica (Ovsicori) reported. By 8:30 a.m. a significant amount of volcanic material was released from the two openings of volcano, “which may indicate that these materials come from deep areas,” Ovsicori said. “It is uncertain what will happen. Volcanologists are heading to the site to evaluate the activity,” the statement said. Experts said Tuesday's activity is “normal for an active volcano such as Turrialba,” but they recommended all nearby communities remain vigilant in coming hours. The released material fell into grasslands and communities in the canton of Turrialba and reached some three kilometers west of the crater. The trail of gases and ash can be seen from various locations in the provinces of Cartago, San José, Heredia and Limón. Public access to the volcano area was closed last year due to the activity. The Turrialba Volcano also emitted material in 2007, 2010 and 2012. The last eruptions of the volcano were in 1884.


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 Post subject: Re: Epidemic of volcano awakenings across planet continues‏
PostPosted: Wed May 22, 2013 6:36 pm 
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Volcano erupts in Alaska

ANCHORAGE, Alaska - One of Alaska's most active volcanoes, which has been belching ash and spewing lava since last week, has forced regional flight cancellations and dusted some nearby communities with ash, scientists and local officials said on Monday. Pavlof Volcano has sent up ash as high as 22,000 feet, with the cloud blowing eastward and the eruption showing no signs of abating, according to the federal-state Alaska Volcano Observatory. The lava from its 8,261-foot (2,518-metre) peak has also created huge steam clouds on meeting the mountain's snow. While the ash plume was still too low on Monday to affect commercial airliners flying at least 30,000 feet above sea level between Asia and North America, it was scrambling schedules for regional carriers serving rural fishing towns and native villages that lack outside road access. PenAir, an Anchorage-based Alaska company specializing in travel in southwestern Alaska, briefly stopped flights to four destinations to wait for ash to dissipate, said Danny Seybert, the carrier's chief executive. “We've had about a dozen cancellations due to the volcano,” he said. PenAir's planes fly at altitudes between 15,000 and 20,000 feet, exactly where they could encounter ash, depending on wind direction, Seybert said. Among the cancellations were flights in and out of Unalaska/Dutch Harbor, the top-volume seafood port in the United States, he said. Ash plumes could go higher, as Pavlof's eruption could intensify with little warning, the Alaska Volcano Observatory said. Trace amounts of ash fell overnight on Nelson Lagoon, a tiny Aleut village of 50 residents located 48 miles northeast of Pavlof. The volcano had earlier sprinkled ash on Sand Point, a fishing town of about 1,000 people, when the wind was blowing in a slightly different direction, according to the observatory. Along with potential aviation hazards, the ash poses possible health risks, said Rick Wessels, a U.S. Geological Survey geophysicist at the observatory. “It's dangerous for the people downwind of it, because you don't really want to breathe in that fine ash that long,” Wessels said of the eruption taking place on the Alaska Peninsula, 590 miles southwest of Anchorage. Pavlof is one of Alaska's most restless volcanoes and had its last major eruption in 2007. The Alaska Volcano Observatory estimates it has erupted about two dozen times between 1901 and 2007.


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 Post subject: Re: Epidemic of volcano awakenings across planet continues‏
PostPosted: Sun May 26, 2013 6:26 pm 
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Mount Etna eruptions becoming more violent

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ITALY - Mount Etna is spitting lava more violently than it has in years, and scientists are baffled as to why. Despite being the world's most-studied volcano, the Sicilian mountain is also its most unpredictable. The volcano is raging. Fountains of lava, some taller than the Eiffel Tower, shoot from its mouth every few weeks, flowing in red-hot streams into the surrounding valleys. There have been 13 eruptions since the beginning of February. Mount Etna, 3,329 meters (10,922 feet) high, towers majestically above the Sicilian city of Catania. In June, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) will decide whether to list it as a World Heritage Site. Etna is considered the most heavily studied volcano in the world, and it is thoroughly wired with sensors. In addition to lava, Etna spits out vast amounts of data -- several gigabytes a day, coming from magnetic field sensors, GPS altimeters and seismic sensors. Despite this wealth of data, Etna still poses a conundrum to scientists. “The eruptions in recent weeks have been unusually fierce and explosive,” reports German volcanologist Boris Behncke, who monitors the mountain together with a few hundred colleagues at Italy's National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV). “There have been lava fountain events in the past, but rarely in such rapid succession.” Behncke has fallen under Etna's spell. During the day, he maps the lava flows; at night, he hikes along its slopes. His Twitter hash tag is “@etnaboris.” The volcano is the first thing he sees when he looks out of his bedroom window every morning. “This time, the range of ash fall is much wider than usual,” says Behncke. A layer of black ash covers cars as far as 50 kilometers (31 miles) away. Even in ancient times, people marveled at the forces that were capable of shooting fountains of lava into the sky. In Greek and Roman mythology, the volcano is represented by a limping blacksmith swinging his hammer as sparks fly. Legend has it that the natural philosopher Empedocles jumped into the crater 2,500 years ago. What he found there remained his secret, because he never returned. All that remained of him were his iron shoes, which the mountain later spat out. For many geologists today, Etna is still the most inscrutable volcano in the world. The mountain is located at precisely the spot where the African and European tectonic plates rub against each other like two giant ice floes. At this plate margin, lava with low viscosity flows upward from a depth of 30 kilometers into a reservoir of magma two kilometers beneath the summit. “The stream of magma doesn't move uniformly, but in spurts, vibrating as if it were in a hydraulic pump,” explains Stuttgart geophysicist Rolf Schick. “This makes Etna so unpredictable.” Schick has been a star among volcanologists since 1972, when he caused a stir with his new discoveries about Etna. Using seismic sensors, he discovered a “pulse rate” of sorts in the stream of magma, which is forced through the vent at a rate of 72 beats per minute -- coincidentally, at a rate similar to that of the human heartbeat.


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